His team dredges up an ancient payload of 39 metal ingots. Interestingly, spectrographic analysis of the recovered alloy reveals the compound is unlike anything ever found in the ancient or modern world.

The interesting part about this is the composition of the ingots that they found. The metal is 80% copper and 20% zinc.

There were other things found in it, but that’s the majority of the opposition. Now zinc only occurs in nature as sphalerite. It’s a zinc-sulfur complex.

To create zinc, which didn’t come around till about 1,000 years ago, you have to process the zinc out of this sulfide. They didn’t have that technology back then.

What was someone doing blending copper, zinc, lead, nickel, iron?

This is a complex alloy. This is nothing easy to do. It suggests the the possibility that it could have special electrical or energetic properties that we don’t even know about.

People would not be expected to be making such a complex alloy back then.

How is it possible that such an advanced alloy was manufactured over 2,600 years ago, centuries before man had the technology to manipulate elements like zinc into metals? And what was its purpose?

Based on the composition of this alloy, scientists believe what they have found is orichalcum, a metal associated with the legendary continent of Atlantis.

According to Plato’s fourth-century dialogues, “The Timaeus” and “Critias,” Atlantis possessed power and technology greater than any other civilization on Earth.

It was founded and ruled over by the Greek god, Poseidon, whose temple was covered in a precious metal called orichalcum, which translates to mountain copper.

The composition of the alloy is not specified by Plato. But based on its electrical properties, color, and luster, scientists suggest that if it did exist, it most likely consisted of copper mixed primarily with zinc, just like the metal found in the shipwreck.

It was said that the temple of Poseidon on Atlantis flashed with the red light of orichalcum. The copper tint of this metal caught the attention of the seekers that came to this sacred place.

This is not just an attractive color. This has spiritual implications. There was something about this metal that was said to resonate with the divine.

Perhaps it was its origin, that it had come from heaven. It fell out of the sky.

According to Plato’s story, the Greek god, Cadmus, son of Poseidon, came down from Mount Olympus and gave orichalcum to the people of Atlantis.

An important figure in early Greek mythology was Cadmus, a divine character, the first hero, fifth in the lineage from Zeus of the Greek gods.

It was Cadmus that brought the making of bronze. He knew how to make alloys, special metals, which in the early days of civilization, was the beginning of technology.

So Cadmus is the one who shows us the divine nature of metalwork and gives this as a gift to the generations.

Why are we so quick to dismiss the underlying stories in those myths?

Those stories talk about extraterrestrials coming and visiting our culture. They talk about gods that walked among us and interacted with humans, but with a severely advanced technology beyond anything that we have today.

Ancient astronaut theory says that the legends of these Greek gods are not just mythological, but they’re rooted in actual events.

Sicily, 2015, archaeologist Sebastiano Tusa excavates a shipwreck less than a mile off the coast, which has remained undisturbed for more than 2,600 years.

His team dredges up an ancient payload of 39 metal ingots. Interestingly, spectrographic analysis of the recovered alloy reveals the compound is unlike anything ever found in the ancient or modern world.

The interesting part about this is the composition of the ingots that they found. The metal is 80% copper and 20% zinc.

There were other things found in it, but that’s the majority of the opposition. Now zinc only occurs in nature as sphalerite. It’s a zinc-sulfur complex.

To create zinc, which didn’t come around till about 1,000 years ago, you have to process the zinc out of this sulfide. They didn’t have that technology back then.

What was someone doing blending copper, zinc, lead, nickel, iron?

This is a complex alloy. This is nothing easy to do. It suggests the the possibility that it could have special electrical or energetic properties that we don’t even know about.

People would not be expected to be making such a complex alloy back then.

How is it possible that such an advanced alloy was manufactured over 2,600 years ago, centuries before man had the technology to manipulate elements like zinc into metals? And what was its purpose?

Based on the composition of this alloy, scientists believe what they have found is orichalcum, a metal associated with the legendary continent of Atlantis.

According to Plato’s fourth-century dialogues, “The Timaeus” and “Critias,” Atlantis possessed power and technology greater than any other civilization on Earth.

It was founded and ruled over by the Greek god, Poseidon, whose temple was covered in a precious metal called orichalcum, which translates to mountain copper.

The composition of the alloy is not specified by Plato. But based on its electrical properties, color, and luster, scientists suggest that if it did exist, it most likely consisted of copper mixed primarily with zinc, just like the metal found in the shipwreck.

It was said that the temple of Poseidon on Atlantis flashed with the red light of orichalcum. The copper tint of this metal caught the attention of the seekers that came to this sacred place.

This is not just an attractive color. This has spiritual implications. There was something about this metal that was said to resonate with the divine.

Perhaps it was its origin, that it had come from heaven. It fell out of the sky.

According to Plato’s story, the Greek god, Cadmus, son of Poseidon, came down from Mount Olympus and gave orichalcum to the people of Atlantis.

An important figure in early Greek mythology was Cadmus, a divine character, the first hero, fifth in the lineage from Zeus of the Greek gods.

It was Cadmus that brought the making of bronze. He knew how to make alloys, special metals, which in the early days of civilization, was the beginning of technology.

So Cadmus is the one who shows us the divine nature of metalwork and gives this as a gift to the generations.

Why are we so quick to dismiss the underlying stories in those myths?

Those stories talk about extraterrestrials coming and visiting our culture. They talk about gods that walked among us and interacted with humans, but with a severely advanced technology beyond anything that we have today.

Ancient astronaut theory says that the legends of these Greek gods are not just mythological, but they’re rooted in actual events.