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What are efforts to control and limit spread of nuclear weapons?

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What are efforts to control and limit spread of nuclear weapons?

The United Nations has made significant efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and ban nuclear tests in space and reservoirs. It achieved great success by getting over one hundred nations to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in 1963 and the Nuclear Weapons Convention Prohibition Treaty in 1968. Over one hundred nations have agreed to use atomic power for peaceful purposes, but complete disarmament has not been achieved yet.

The 1991 Iraq-Kuwait War, in which Iraq had to end its occupation of Kuwait, led to the destruction of its chemical and other narcotic weapons through sanctions based on several resolutions of th After the disintegration of the Soviet Union in December 1991, the US and the Russian Federation agreed to destroy even long-range weapons. In April 1992, Ukraine announced that it would comply with START (Ukraine was a former republic of the Soviet Union). A treaty was signed between the US and Russia in January 1994, under which it was agreed that the long-range missiles aimed at each other by the two countries would be removed. Additionally, both countries signed agreements with the President of Ukraine to eliminate its 1800 nuclear weapons.

Disarmament is considered an important means of establishing world peace, but some obstacles arise in the way of disarmament. Terrorism prevailing in the world today is the biggest obstacle in the path of disarmament. As terrorists continue to access more modern technological weapons on the open market, any attempt at disarmament can be suicidal for any nation. The distrustful environment among nations keeps them from taking the initiative in this direction due to mutual suspicion and mistrust.

The competitive mentality of nations is the biggest obstacle in the path of disarmament. Disarmament means to limit, control, or cut down on armaments, and the basic problem of disarmament is to reduce the arms of all countries proportionately. When determining the limit of arms, each country has an apprehension towards the other country that perhaps it is trying to increase its power and reduce the power of the opposing side. Often, proposals for disarmament are also one-sided, making the problem of proportional disarmament even more difficult.

First, disarmament or political problems should be resolved. If one is resolved, the other is easily resolved. If disarmament is done, political disputes will resolve themselves, and if political disputes are resolved, disarmament will be easy.

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was proposed to ban nuclear tests around the world, especially nuclear weapons. It came into existence in 1968 as the next phase of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which came into force in 1970. The CTBT aims to eliminate the option of making nuclear weapons by including countries that have not signed the NPT in the treaty. Major such countries include India, Pakistan, and Israel.

India vetoed the ‘Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty’ at the Geneva Convention on August 14, 1996. Australia proposed to accept its draft in the United Nations General Assembly on September 7, 1996, but India’s disagreement prevented it from being ineffective until India did not accept it. Indian representatives took a clear stand that they would not sign the present draft of the treaty. They believed that they fully agreed to ban the tests but that they should be linked to the process of eliminating nuclear weapons. India adopted a strict attitude towards the treaty, anticipating the strategic policy of nuclear power-rich nations, particularly America, and categorically refusing to sign it.

India is concerned about the potential consequences of signing the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which aims to ban nuclear tests around the world, particularly nuclear weapons. The CTBT, which came into existence in 1968, is the next phase of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which came into force in 1970. It is the next phase of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and includes five nations recognized in this category: America, Russia, China, France, and England. However, India has not accepted the CTBT due to discrimination.

The main purpose of the CTBT is to eliminate the option of making nuclear weapons by including countries that have not signed the NPT, such as India, Pakistan, and Israel. The main obstacle to disarmament is the solution to political problems, which obstruct the path of disarmament. First, disarmament or political problems should be resolved, and when one is resolved, the other is easily resolved.

Terrorism is the biggest obstacle in the path of disarmament, as terrorists are increasingly getting modern weapons from arms-manufacturing countries. Disarmament means to limit, control, or cut down on armaments, and the basic problem of disarmament is to reduce the arms of all countries proportionately. The United Nations has made commendable efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and nuclear testing in space and water bodies, such as the Partial Nuclear Test Prohibition Treaty in 1963 and the Nuclear Weapons Convention Prohibition Treaty in 1968.

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